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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
who named his child adolf hitler in new jersey. that kid is stuck with that. or osama bin laden or sean hannity. these are horrible names! >> sean hannity, that is not fair. >> all kidding aside, one quick thing, i know stephanie wants to jump in. in tennessee, turned statute of child abuse, it includes not just physical abuse, but imminent mental abuse. if you're going to name your child messiah or a worse name, a more challenging name, the child live withes it, not the parent. they think it's cute and fun. your kid has to go every day with that and get beaten up or ostracized from society. that's wrong. >> stephanie, dean makes a point. but dean, messiah is number four among fastest growing baby names in this country. so there are lots of messiahs running around. so, you know, when a judge -- forget the judge's rationale. even dean's rationale, does it add up that the name would be some insipient child abuse? >> well, a worm hole has opened in the universe yet again in that i agree with michael. >> i was -- >> the judge -- the judge is clearly overreaching here. you know, sadl
interview of osama bin laden back in 1997. gregory johnsen is the author of the last refuge, yemen, al qaeda and america's war in arabia. welcome. peter, what triggered all of this as far as we understand it is the head of al qaeda sent a message to al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, in yemen, asking them, you know, do some terrorism, please. >> yeah, do something. >> now, is that a sign of weakness or strength? >> it's a sign of just sending a message. i mean it's do something is pretty -- it's not like, you know, the end of the world is coming. and so far whatever that something is hasn't transpired. and i think that al qaeda central is aware of its own problems and even al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is not doing particularly well, despite all of the flurry of things we've seen over the past week. about 30 of their leaders and south operatives have been killed in cia drone strikes, so their bench is thinning. >> why has yemen become the next place, after afghanistan, pakistan? >> right. well, i think in yemen you have a very weak central government so this is a government that doesn't
: a few years back when the hunt for osama bin laden was still raging, some intelligence forces believed al qaeda was even developing its own intranet that was electronically hidden behind jihadi websites and accessible to only a few people. whether they succeeded or such a system still exists like much of the communication structure remains shrouded in mystery. tom foreman, washington. >> of course the great irony using so much american innovation to try to destroy america. >>> our tourt fourth story outfront, dr. sanjay gupta changes his mind on weed. 20 states allow medical marijuana. and the medical community seems to be changing its mind on pot. but you know, not everybody is. a lot are adamantly against it. but there is a dramatic turn around for dr. gupta who just four years ago wrote an article for "time" magazine titled why i would vote no for pot. the ground breaking new documentary airing this sunday on cnn. and in it, he explained why he changed his mind. sanjay, the fda says marijuana is harmful, we know that. michael bloomberg is quoted saying medical marijuana is the great
for airing osama bin laden's anti-american videos after 9/11. the network's executives are well aware of its perception problem but they say that's going to disappear once you see their programming and they have been aggressively hiring high profile american journalists and opening bureaus in cities around the country. joining me to discuss the latest player in cable news here in washington, michael calderone, media reporter for the huffington post and edward fell 17 thaul, managing editor for time.com. welcome to you both. >> thanks. >> before we start, i should mention that al jazeera also accepted our invitation for both its interim ceo and its president of news to join us today, but then it cancelled. so moving on here, edward, let me start with you. there's so much competition now in cable news, including planned or already on the air networks from china, russia, univision with abc, fox just started a sports network. is there room for another news network? >> i think it's a great time to launch. just this week vice, which used to be a canadian music magazine was valued somewhere close t
for osama bin laden was still raging, some intelligence forces believed al qaeda was even developing its own intranet that was electronically hidden behind jihadi websites and accessible to only a few people. whether they succeeded or such a system still exists like much of the communication structure remains shrouded in mystery. tom foreman, washington. >> of course the great irony using so much american innovation to try to destroy america. "outfront" next why dr. sanjay gupta change ed his mind on weed. an about-face and he h eel explain why. >>> then are you driving a compact car that failed a crash test? we have the alarming results. >>> and a double play. he made the catch but what he did next was the true score. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the pla
for taking down osama bin laden and he had a warning about the dangers out there. >> al qaeda affiliates and like-minded extremists still threaten our homeland, still threaten our diplomatic facilities, still threaten our businesses abroad. we have to take these threats seriously. >> the signs of the threat triggered a global terror alert an the basis for it. what got everyone so worked up? eli lake and josh row gan believe they know. their daily beast article is headed al qaeda conference call intercepted by u.s. officials sparked alerts. some kind of conference call that one intelligence official described it this way, like the meeting of he legion of doom. we are joined by fran townsend. she serves on the dhs and security advisory boards. i know you can only say so much because you want to protect sources and are concerned about balancing your reporting with national security. cnn has spoken to a number of sources tell, as well as terrorism experts who say that 20-plus leaders of al qaeda communicating with each other at the same time on a conference call would be a big departure and
you think of the capture of osama bin laden, a physical courier driving the car that they were able to follow, so we've heard about this before. but this is an electronic trail, that's how they were able to find this. how do they do it? >> so, here's what happened, after a seven-hour internet conference between all of these leaders, the details of that conference, the minutes of it, were given to this courier and he then took it and tried to send it around to a greater distribution list inside the al qaeda community. when he did that, he made some mistakes in his operational security and they were able to catch the mistakes and track him and with the help of the yemeni authorities pick him up and capture him and when they got him they found a video of the entire seven-hour conference call along with a host of all other sorts of goodies about what al qaeda was up to. that is exactly how we found out about the worldwide terror threat that prompted the embassy closings. the courier himself is still in custody somewhere in yemen being held by yemeni authorities and they are still going
, we are accomplishing what we set out to do. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been handled. the core of al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan is on the way to defeat. that happened because of you. because of you, more afghans are re-claiming their communities, their markets, their schools, their towns. they have a chance to forge their own future. because of you, more afghans are trained in stepping up and defending their own country. because of you and to preserve the gains you fought and bled for, we are going to make sure that afghanistan is never again a source of attacks against our country. that happened because of you. so the war in afghanistan will end, for you that means fewer deployments, more training time, preparing for the future, getting back to what marines do better than anybody else on earth, amphibious operations. it means more time here on the home front with your families, your wives, your husbands, your kids. but, of course, the end of the war in afghanistan doesn't mean the end of threats to our nation. as
? >> remember how osama bin laden was operating, it could take three weeks. he's issuing general guidance, more higher level guidance and leaving the tactics up to genuine it's. >> you tried to get him when you were head of national intelligence. i assume the u.s. is still trying to get him. why is it so hard to get ayman al zawahiri? >> who is that guy in our country, richard jewell, he disappeared in our country. >> the outgoing cia, the deputy director, he gave an interviews to the wall street journal in which he said syria is probably the most important issue in the world today because of where it is currently heading. he's deeply concerned about chemical weapon stockpiles, other weapons in syria getting into the hands of al qaeda and others. is this the biggest national security threat the u.s. faces right now? >> i would say as far as the geopolitical situation, i would agree with mike morel. it's not just the chemical weapon. if you look at the place that syria occupies, the funnel for iranian aid going to hezbollah, so it's a life line for hezbollah, it's iran's beach head, it has a bor
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)